The Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book — Pumpkin Pie

7 Oct

The perfect Canadian Thanksgiving Day post! From a classic cookbook in Savvy’s

Laura Secord Cook book — A Canadian Classic

mom’s kitchen. This volume was published in 1966 by McClelland and Stewart Limited and sponsored by the Laura Secord Candy Shops. The recipes were assembled by the Canadian Home Economics Association and was edited by Sally, Henry, Lorraine Swirsky and Carol Taylor.

Claiming to be the very first collection of all Canadian recipes, the LSCB, has been well used in Savvy’s mom’s household. It is ‘not modern, fancy, cooking’ as Savvy’s mom says.  The historical, real life Laura Secord figured prominently in Canada’s “win” against the United States of America in the War of 1812 so the timing is perfect to bring you the cookbook’s recipe for Pumpkin Pie.

I failed miserably in early attempts to prepare a good pie crust, so I stayed away from pie-making for a very long time. As a Savvy Single, I find that small galettes made from puff pastry offer the best success both in serving size and results.

Well thumbed pages of cook book

But for a dinner party or to take to a potluck, a whole pie could be just what a Savvy cook needs to have up her sleeve. Perhaps some day I will convince my mother to write a post on pastry making, but I find the frozen Tenderflake pie shells give good results. I usually buy their deep-dish version as it more closely resembles the look of a home-make pie. If you are trying to fool someone, transfer the frozen shell from its tin foil pan into a glass one for a more authentic presentation.

When I make pumpkin pie, this Laura Secord Cook Book recipe is the filling I use. Start by thawing the pie shell according to the package instructions. Do not prick the bottom of the pie crust. Preheat the oven to 450°F.

In a large mixing bowl, beat together by hand 2 eggs, 1 cup/250 mL of milk (we use 1 small can of evaporated milk and top up with regular milk to measure 1 cup/250 mL in total), 1-14 ounce can or 1½ cup/375 mL of pure pumpkin pureé (NOT pumpkin pie filling) and ½ teaspoon/2.5 mL of salt.

In another bowl, whisk together 1-1/3 cups/333 mL lightly packed brown sugar, 1 teaspoon/5 mL cinnamon, ½ teaspoon/2.5 mL ginger, ½ teaspoon/2.5 mL nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon/1.25 mL cloves.

Pumpkin Pie Perfection

Add the mixed dry ingredients to the pumpkin mixture and stir to combine well. Pour the filling into the prepared pie shell.
Bake the pie on the bottom rack of a gas oven (or on the bottom 1/3 rack position in an electric oven) at 450°F for 10 minutes. Then reduce the oven temperature to 350°F and bake for 45 – 50 minutes more or until the filling is almost set. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on a rack. Can be stored covered, at a cool-ish room temperature (i.e. not in the heat of a kitchen or near a fireplace) until ready to serve.

Real whipped cream tops the pie

This pumpkin filling has well-balanced spices and a light creamy texture. Best served with real whipped cream. The pies photographed for this post are from Savvy’s mother’s hand and kitchen and with Mom’s perfect pie pastry crusts.

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2 Responses to “The Laura Secord Canadian Cook Book — Pumpkin Pie”

  1. thehungrymum October 8, 2012 at 5:52 am #

    I *love* pumpkin pie. Yours looks incredible 🙂

    • Susan at Savvy Single Suppers October 8, 2012 at 7:57 pm #

      As much as I would like to take credit for the incredible looking (and tasting) pies in these pictures, they were made by my mother to serve for Thanksgiving dinner. Terrific pie crust pastry and the filling. She does it all, Savvy’s mom!

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